The Texture of Creation

The Texture of Creation
for Double SATB Chorus and organ
(with optional Brass Quintet and Timpani)
by
Dan Locklair

The Texture of Creation
(for double SATB chorus, brass quintet, timpani and organ) was composed in 1983 for the Inauguration that year of Thomas K. Hearn, Jr. as Twelfth President of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina (the school where I am Composer-in-Residence and Professor of Music). The text, by former Wake Forest University staff member, Martha W. Lentz, was specifically created for this piece.

In three sections, the majestic instrumental section that opens the piece abounds with dialogue and later returns to mark the closing section of the composition. The largely unison choir enters after each of these sections proclaiming that we, the gathered people, “…are the texture of creation.” A middle section only accompanied by organ, highlighting the words “we are constantly weaving new fabric,” divides the choir into eight parts and is contrapuntal in texture.

For ideal performance of this festive choral work, the choirs, timpani and organ should be located at the opposite end of the performance space from the brass ensemble. The two choirs should also be divided in antiphonal fashion. Due to the many varieties of acoustical environments, however, the exact placement of these forces is left up to the judgment of the conductor.

Originally published in a chorus and organ version by Music 70, this version is now published by Subito.
Brass and percussion parts for the original, full version are available from Subito.

Dan Locklair
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Duration: ca. 4 ½ minutes

The Texture of Creation
by Martha W. Lentz

We are the texture of creation.
This is a place of consecration.
Now is a time of transformation.

From differences that strengthen us,
And ancient disciplines that define us,
We are constantly weaving new fabric.

We are the texture of creation.
This is a place of consecration.
Now is a time of transformation.

(Used with permission of Martha W. Lentz)